Yes, This Will Be On the Test

Writing, Reading, Laughing

Monday, April 28, 2014

X is for X-Men

Welcome to Yes, This Will Be On the Test.
Waving to visitors, new followers, and fellow A to Z participants. I’m sending virtual hugs to you all for taking a moment to stop by.

I’ll be sharing my “take-aways.” All those snigglets, golden nuggets, and lessons learned from other creative sources.


Scroll down this link to find other wonderful A to Z participants.

One of the movies I can't wait to see is


I love the premise of the X-Men series. 

People with unique powers and capabilities being given a safe haven where they can celebrate and learn to understand their otherness.

A parallel theme occurs in the wonderful book by Ransom Riggs - 


Where peculiars, children with special powers like levitation or fire conjuring, are nurtured and protected. 
Not ostracized or bullied.

The core message in both stories hits close to home for me. 

As a teacher I spend my days with many children that would be considered "others." 

It's frightening how quickly people define others based on minimal understanding. I see it beginning in elementary school. Body type, intellect, sexuality can all make someone a target for unkindness.

One of my goals as a teacher is to show the merits of embracing and learning from otherness, not condemning it.

I appreciate stories that help spread that sentiment, especially in children's literature.

TAKE AWAY - 
That which is the other may be a treasure.

What are stories with this theme are special to you?

12 comments:

  1. I'm looking forward to this one, too.

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  2. Sad how people judge. If the reviews are good, I may watch X-Men. Not sure yet.

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  3. I LOVE X-Men and can't wait to see the movie. I have the Riggs book in my TBR and must get to it. My fav bullying-related things are two movies, "Powder" and "Phenomenon." Touching movies also to do with supernaturally gifted people. :)

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  4. It's interesting how having powers has become parallel with being different in fiction. I love the way they weave in the "bully loses, unique person wins" theme in all of these types of stories.

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  6. I don't read comics (for the most part, there are a very few exceptions) but I usually like comic-inspired movies. The X-Men movies in particular. I wonder if that is (in part, at least) because of what you describe. Though I didn't love Miss Peregrine's, but that was for reasons outside of the idea of protecting peculiar children.

    I was definitely an 'Other' growing up, and my childhood was made slightly less horrible by a handful of caring teachers. I suspect you are very much like them, affecting children more deeply than you can imagine.

    Edited to sound less condescending, which is the exact opposite of what I was going for. I admire what you do.

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  7. Who are we to judge?
    Can't wait for that movie either!

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  8. I spent a lot of time reading the X-Men and the spinoff titles when I was a teenager, so the movies have been a little bit of a disappointment to me. But they are still very cool.

    I grew up as one of the 'others' and didn't have teachers to help me. My self esteem was so low for so long it was almost non-existent. I still have some issues with it now, 19 years after graduating high school. But I did have friends among the other 'others' and we tried to take care of each other.

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  9. Leslie, I'm doubly impressed: first that you managed such a great topic for 'X', and second, that you were able to work in such an important and beautiful message. Thank you :)

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  10. The book you mentioned is on my reading list. I can't wait to read it..

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  11. Such a great message in this post about people who are labeled "other."

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  12. I am also excited for that movie. And love that book too! If you have time, and want to, you can check out my X post.

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